Commit b5a44b24 authored by Robert Smith's avatar Robert Smith
Browse files

Updated ParaView and Geometry Editor tutorials



The ParaView tutorial now explains how to form a remote connection with
the updated interface.

The Geometry Editor tutorial has been updated to include the new camera
controls. 
Signed-off-by: Robert Smith's avatarRobert Smith <SmithRW@ornl.gov>
parent f480db72
......@@ -35,10 +35,9 @@ and click OK.
\section{Camera}
You can change the perspecive of the camera by clicking and dragging inside the
You can change the perspective of the camera by clicking and dragging inside the
Geometry Editor. You can see this initially by the way the three axes and the
reference plane move as you rotate the camera about the origin. Scrolling the
mouse wheel will zoom the camera in or out.
reference plane move as you rotate the camera about the origin. If you hold shift while dragging, you will instead move the central point the camera is focused on. If you hold ctrl, you can drag the mouse up or down to zoom in or out, respectively. Scrolling the mouse wheel offers another way to zoom the camera.
\section{Primitive Shapes}
......@@ -150,7 +149,7 @@ button highlighted above. This will open a new dialog.
\end{center}
The quantity is the number of desired copies of the shape which should be in the
replication. This includes the orignal (ie setting quantity to 2 will result in
replication. This includes the original (ie setting quantity to 2 will result in
2 shapes, the original and a copy).
The Shift boxes allow you to specify an offset to be placed between each copy.
......
......@@ -9,26 +9,11 @@ not currently support ParaView connections on Windows. You will also need an
installation of ParaView on your local machine. ParaView can be downloaded from
its \href{http://www.paraview.org/download/}{official website}. The ICE
development team recommends using the latest available version of ParaView,
currently 5.0.1 at the time of this writing. You will further need a custom
currently 5.0 at the time of this writing. You will further need a custom
Python HTTP web server implementation, which can be downloaded from the
\href{http://eclipseice.ornl.gov/downloads/paraview/scripts/http_pvw_server.py}{Oak
Ridge website}.
\subsection{Launching ParaView}
Before connecting to ParaView, it must be launched from the command line. This
can be done by running the command:
\textbf{DISPLAY\=:0 (ParaView installation folder)/bin/pvpython (Path to web
server file)/http\_pvw\_server.py -{}-host localhost -{}-port 8600}.
On Mac, the first path should instead end in \newline
\textbf{/paraview.app/Contents/bin/pvpython} to specify the file inside of the
ParaView application.
This will launch the web server script in ParaView Python. You can specify a
different port as needed by using a different number after ``-port''.
\subsection{Configuring the ParaView Connection}
Once ParaView is running, ICE must be configured to connect to the server. This
......@@ -48,13 +33,30 @@ side of the Preferences window.
Press the button with a ''+" symbol in the upper right (highlighted in the image
above) to add a new row to the table. Click on cells in the new row to edit
their values. The default values automatically supplied by ICE should be
appropriate for most users. However, the Port field should be changed to the
port number you specified when starting the server. (8600 if using the example
above.)
their values.
\textbf{Name:} The connection's name. The default value will be fine.
\textbf{Host:} The hostname for the machine that will run ParaView. Use "localhost" if the machine running ICE will also be used to run ParaView.
\textbf{Port:} The port number on which the ParaView server will run. The default value will be fine, but if you change it, it must different from the Visualizer Port.
\textbf{Path:} The path to your ParaView installation.
On Linux, the path will end with the top level folder into which ParaView was unzipped. For example, if you have a folder named ParaView on your desktop that contains the bin, doc, lib, and share folders, then your path would be /home/username/Desktop/ParaView.
On Mac, the path will end with the folder containing your ParaView.app. For example, if you have installed ParaView to your Applications folder, the path will simply be /Applications
\textbf{Server Script Path:} The full path to the http_pvw_server.py file, ending with the folder containing it. For example if the file is on your desktop, the path might be /home/username/Desktop.
\textbf{Visualizer Port:} The port number for the ParaView web visualizer. The default value will be fine, but if you change it, then it must be different from the port number you provide for Port.
\textbf{Remote OS:} The operating system of the remote machine on which ParaView will be launched. If you want to launch ParaView on your local machine, ignore this cell. Otherwise, specify either "Linux" or "OSx".
\textbf{Remote ParaView Version Number:} The version of ParaView you are using. This may be ignored unless you are launching a remote ParaView session on a Linux machine. You can check your installation's version number by looking inside the top level \textbf{lib} folder. It will contain a folder named paraview- followed by the version number.
Once finished editing the cells in the new row, press Apply, then OK. ICE will
then connect to the ParaView server.
then launch the ParaView server and connect to it. If you are connecting to a remote machine, you will be prompted for permission to make the remote connection and asked for a password.
\section{Opening a ParaView File}
......@@ -79,15 +81,20 @@ be imported into, as shown below.
\end{center}
Once a file is in the Project Explorer, simply double click on it to open it in
ParaView.
ParaView. Local ParaView connections can only open local files, while remote ParaView connections can only open files on the remote host.
\subsection{Using ParaView}
\subsubsection{Camera Controls}
The Plot Editor allows the user to rotate the model by clicking and dragging
inside the display area or adjust the zoom by scrolling the mouse wheel. Other
commands vary slightly between the two utilities.
inside the display area or adjust the zoom by scrolling the mouse wheel.
\begin{center}
\includegraphics[width=12cm]{images/ParaViewPlotEditor}
\end{center}
The buttons in the upper left can also be used to manipulate the camera. The green plus sign will zoom in, while the black minus sign will zoom out. The green circular arrow button will reset the camera to its default position.
\subsubsection{Selecting the Plot}
......@@ -140,50 +147,17 @@ accordingly.
\section{Accessing a ParaView Web Server}
It is also possible to access the full ParaView web viewer application inside of
ICE. This allows for full access to all the web viewer's features and for remote
connections to another machine hosting the ParaView session, even for Windows
clients.
\subsection{Launching the ParaView Web Visualizer}
Before connecting, the visualizer needs to be started from the command line.
ParaView's package structure is different on each operating system,
neccesitating a different command for each.
For the following commands, replace paraview-install with the path to your
machine's ParaView installation and data-folder with the path to the top level
folder under which all files you wish to visualize are kept.
For \textbf{Linux} run:
\textbf{paraview-install/bin/pvpython
paraview-install/lib/paraview-5.0/\newline
site-packages/paraview/web/pv\_web/visualizer.py -{}-content
paraview-install/share/paraview-5.0/www/ -{}-data-dir data-folder/ -{}-port
8600}
For \textbf{Mac OS} run:
\textbf{paraview-install/paraview.app/Contents/bin/pvpython
paraview-install/paraview.app/Contents/Python/paraview/web/\newline
pv\_web\_visulizer.py -{}-content
paraview-install/paraview.app/\newline Contents/www/ -{}-data-dir data-folder/
-{}-port 8600}
In all cases, the arguement following ``--port'' can be changed to set the port
number the server will use.
ICE. This allows for full access to all the web viewer's features.
\subsection{Accessing the Visualizer}
Now that the visualizer is running, it can be accessed by the client machine,
which may be the same machine running the server.
First, you must open a Plot Editor as described above.
Within ICE, click Window $\rightarrow$ Show View $\rightarrow$ Other\ldots to
open a dialog of views. Select General $\rightarrow$ Internal Web Browser from
it and press OK.
\begin{center}
\includegraphics[width=12cm]{images/ParaViewPlotEditor}
\end{center}
Finally, navigate to http://hostname:8600/apps/Visualizer inside the browser,
replacing the hostname and port number as appropriate.
Press the "Open in Web Visualizer" button in the top left to launch the web visualizer server and automatically open an internal web browser to view it.
\subsection{Using the Visualizer}
......@@ -193,11 +167,9 @@ In order to load a data file, click the Show File List button as seen below.
\includegraphics[width=12cm]{images/ParaViewVisualizer}
\end{center}
This will place the contents of the folder specified by the --data-dir arguement
when launching the visualizer into the side bar. You may then double click on a
file to load it into the model.
This will place the contents of the data directory into the side bar. For sessions, the data directory will be your ICE workspace. For a remote connection, this will be the folder containing the remote file you are visualizing. You may then double click on a file to load it into the model.
You can click and drag the mouse to rotate the camera and right click followed
by dragging up or down to zoom. A full description of the visualizer's features
are beyond the scope of this tutorial, but see the official documentation
is beyond the scope of this tutorial, but see the official documentation
\href{http://www.paraview.org/ParaView3/Doc/Nightly/www/js-doc/index.html#!/guide/web_visualizer}{here}.
\ No newline at end of file
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