Commit 47302130 authored by Dan Allen's avatar Dan Allen
Browse files

grammar and spelling fixes (PR #31)

Authored by: Younes-L <Younes-L@users.noreply.github.com>
parent a1259173
......@@ -68,7 +68,7 @@ The id (`#`) shorthand can be used on inline quoted text.
== Use an ID as an anchor
//um anchor: anchordef
An anchor (aka ID) can be defined almost anywhere in the document, including on section title, on a discrete heading, on a paragraph, on an image, on a delimited block, on an inline phrase, and so forth.
An anchor (aka ID) can be defined almost anywhere in the document, including on a section title, on a discrete heading, on a paragraph, on an image, on a delimited block, on an inline phrase, and so forth.
The anchor is declared by enclosing a _valid_ XML Name in double square brackets (e.g., `+[[idname]]+`) or using the shorthand ID syntax (e.g., `[#idname]`) at the start of an attribute list.
The double square bracket form requires the ID to start with a letter, an underscore, or a colon, ensuring the ID is portable.
......
......@@ -35,7 +35,7 @@ This is a sidebar with two options assigned to it.
For instance, consider a table with the three built-in option values, `header`, `footer`, and `autowidth`, assigned to it.
<<ex-table-short>> shows how the values are assigned using the shorthand notation.
.Table assigned three options using the shorthand syntax
.Table with three options assigned using the shorthand syntax
[source#ex-table-short]
----
[%header%footer%autowidth,cols=2*~]
......@@ -75,7 +75,7 @@ This is a sidebar with three options assigned to it.
Let's revisit the table in <<ex-table-short>> that has the three built-in option values, `header`, `footer`, and `autowidth`, assigned to it using the shorthand notation (`%`).
Instead of using the shorthand notation, <<ex-table-formal>> shows how the values are assigned using the formal syntax.
.Table assigned three options using the formal syntax
.Table with three options assigned using the formal syntax
[source#ex-table-formal]
----
[cols=2*~,options="header,footer,autowidth"]
......@@ -91,7 +91,7 @@ Instead of using the shorthand notation, <<ex-table-formal>> shows how the value
== Using options with other attributes
Let's consider `options` when combined with other attributes.
The following example show how to structure an attribute list when you have style, role, and options attributes.
The following example shows how to structure an attribute list when you have style, role, and options attributes.
.Shorthand
[source]
......
......@@ -28,7 +28,7 @@ include::example$include.adoc[tag=tag-co]
<.> Assign a unique name to the `tag` directive. In this example the tag is called _timings_.
<.> Insert another comment line where you want the tagged region to end.
<.> Assign the name of the region you want to terminate to the `end` directive.
<.> This is the start a tagged snippet named _parse_.
<.> This is the start of a tagged snippet named _parse_.
<.> This is the end of the tagged snippet named _parse_.
IMPORTANT: The `tag::[]` and `end::[]` directives should be placed after a line comment as defined by the language of the source file.
......
......@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@ From there, you can customize the text of the reference in various ways.
It's important to understand that many anchors are already defined for you.
Using default settings, Asciidoctor automatically creates an anchor for every section and discrete heading.
It does so by generating an ID for that section (or discrete heading) and registering that ID in the references catalog.
You can then use that ID as the target of an cross reference.
You can then use that ID as the target of a cross reference.
For example, considering the following section.
......
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