Commit 7b8e95b7 authored by arbennett's avatar arbennett
Browse files

Merge branch 'next' of https://github.com/eclipse/ice into next

parents 6a2b14f3 42785f40
......@@ -55,39 +55,50 @@
\affil{Oak Ridge National Laboratory}
\maketitle{}
\chapter{Installation Details}
\graphicspath{{../../installation/src/}}
\input{../../installation/src/content}
\chapter{The Eclipse ICE Item Project Generator}
\graphicspath{{../../newItemGeneration/src/}}
\input{../../newItemGeneration/src/content}
\chapter{Working with Resource Components}
\graphicspath{{../../resourceComponents/src/}}
\input{../../resourceComponents/src/content}
\chapter{Dynamically Extending the Eclipse ICE UI}
\graphicspath{{../../dynamicUI/src/}}
\input{../../dynamicUI/src/content}
\chapter{EASE Scripting}
\graphicspath{{../../scripting/src/}}
\lstset{inputpath=../../scripting/src/}
\input{../../scripting/src/content}
\chapter{The Eclipse ICE Developer Menu}
\graphicspath{{../../developerMenu/src/}}
\input{../../developerMenu/src/content}
\chapter{Geometry Editor}
\graphicspath{{../../geometryEditor/src/}}
\input{../../geometryEditor/src/content}
\chapter{Mesh Editor}
\graphicspath{{../../meshEditor/src/}}
\input{../../meshEditor/src/content}
%\input{../../moose-tutorial/src/content.tex} % FIXME! Incorrect structure.
%\chapter{Simulating Neutron Reflectivity}
%\graphicspath{{../../reflectivity/src/}}
%\input{../../reflectivity/src/content}
\chapter{Visualization}
\graphicspath{{../../visualization/src/}}
\input{../../visualization/src/content}
\chapter{Paraview}
\graphicspath{{../../paraviewTutorial/src/}}
\input{../../paraviewTutorial/src/content}
......
\chapter{The Eclipse ICE Developer Menu}
\subsection*{Overview}
The Eclipse Integrated Computational Environment (ICE) has had a great track
record of providing a comprehensive environment for general scientific
......
......@@ -7,6 +7,7 @@
\begin{document}
\chapter{The Eclipse ICE Developer Menu}
\input{content}
\end{document}
\chapter{Dynamically Extending the Eclipse ICE UI}
This tutorial will show you how to create custom, dynamic UI extensions to
Eclipse ICE.
......
......@@ -30,6 +30,7 @@
\begin{document}
\chapter{Dynamically Extending the Eclipse ICE UI}
\input{content}
\end{document}
\ No newline at end of file
\chapter{Geometry Editor}
This article is designed to outline the basic controls of ICE's Geometry Editor.
\section{Getting Started}
......
......@@ -10,6 +10,7 @@
\title{Editing Geometries}
\maketitle{}
\chapter{Geometry Editor}
\input{content}
\end{document}
\chapter{Eclipse ICE Tutorial Installation Details}
You have been provided a USB stick with all you will need for this tutorial. On
this drive is the following: ICE binaries for your OS, VisIt binaries for your
OS, tools to install Docker, all tutorial documentation and slides for today,
data files for the tutorial, and a Eclipse ICE workspace with ICE cloned for
your convenience.
this drive is the following: ICE binaries for your OS, a clone of the ICE git
repository, all tutorial documentation and slides for today, and
data files for the tutorial.
\section*{Docker Installation}
Before we begin, we will need to have Docker installed to enable scientific code
execution with ICE. ICE handles local and remote job launching for general
scientific computing, but since we don't have enough time in this tutorial to
build any science codes and their dependencies, we are providing a Docker image
with a science code already built and configured. To use it, you must have
Docker installed, which is OS specific. To see how to install Docker for your
OS, go to \url{https://docs.docker.com/engine/installation/}. For Linux this
is pretty self-explanatory, just use your package manager to install docker
and start the docker daemon running.
For Mac and Windows users in this tutorial,
we have provided the Docker Toolbox installers on the USB stick. After
installing Docker Toolbox, you will need to start up a new docker machine. To do so, run the following:
\begin{lstlisting}[language=bash]
docker-machine create --driver virtualbox default
\end{lstlisting}
then on Mac OS, add the following to your bash\_profile
\begin{lstlisting}[language=bash]
eval "$(docker-machine env default)"
\end{lstlisting}
On Windows, you will need to run the following after creating the default
docker-machine:
\begin{lstlisting}[language=bash]
docker-machine env --shell cmd default
for /f "tokens=*" %i in ('docker-machine env
--shell cmd default') do %i
\end{lstlisting}
\section*{ICE Installation}
A number of files must first be copied from the
USB stick to your local machine:
\begin{enumerate}
\item Choose a location that is easy to remember
and copy the correct \texttt{ice\-product*.zip} file for your computer's
operation system (Linux, Mac OS X, or Windows).
\item Unzip this file to obtain the
ICE application executable.
\item Copy the git repository \texttt{repository.zip} file to your computer.
\item Unzip this file.
\end{enumerate}
\section*{Starting ICE}
To start ICE, select the correct ice-product* zip file on the USB stick and
unzip it to get the ICE Application. Double-click to open up ICE. When the workspace chooser
dialog opens, select the workspace we have provided on the USB stick (either to
the location you copied it to on your local machine, or on the USB stick
itself, see below image).
To start ICE, double-click on the application executable to open up ICE. When the workspace chooser
dialog opens, select the default workspace.
\begin{center} \includegraphics[width=\textwidth]{figures/workspace}
\end{center}
When ICE opens you should see something similar to the below image.
\begin{center} \includegraphics[width=\textwidth]{figures/expectedICE}
\end{center}
The first thing you should do is import the existing projects in the workspace
we have provided. To do this, first open the Git perspective and select Add and
Existing Local Git Repository. Point the wizard to the ice folder in the
workspace, and import ICE as a new Git repository (you should have something
like the image below).
\begin{center} \includegraphics[width=\textwidth]{figures/clone} \end{center}
Now, right click on the ICE repository and select Import Projects. You should
see the below wizard pages, simply select Next on the first page, and Finish on
the second page.
\begin{center} \includegraphics[width=\textwidth]{figures/importProjects}
\end{center}
After this you should see the following:
\section*{Setting up ICE}
In order to develop an application dashboard, a development version of ICE
must be setup. The first step in doing this is to load the ICE bundles into
your workspace. We have provided a developer menu to assist in this process:
\begin{enumerate}
\item Select \texttt{Developer $\rightarrow$ ICE $\rightarrow$
Import from local repository}
\item Using the directory dialog, navigate to the git repository you copied
from the USB drive.
\item Select \texttt{Open}
\end{enumerate}
This should import all the ICE bundles and you should have something
like the image below.
\begin{center} \includegraphics[width=\textwidth]{figures/cloned} \end{center}
......@@ -14,6 +14,7 @@
\begin{document}
\chapter{Installation Details}
\input{content}
\end{document}
\chapter{Mesh Editor}
\section{Editing Meshes}
This document is designed to outline the basic user controls of the Mesh Editor plugin in ICE.
......
......@@ -7,6 +7,7 @@
\begin{document}
\chapter{Mesh Editor}
\input{content}
\end{document}
\chapter{The Eclipse ICE Item Project Generator}
\section*{Overview}
This tutorial will teach you how you
......
......@@ -14,6 +14,7 @@
\begin{document}
\chapter{The Eclipse ICE Item Project Generator}
\input{content}
\end{document}
......
\chapter{Paraview}
ICE features functionality for visualizing models using ParaView.
\section{Installation and Configuration}
......
......@@ -11,6 +11,7 @@
\title{Visualizing Output With Paraview}
\maketitle{}
\chapter{Paraview}
\input{content}
\end{document}
......
\chapter{Simulating Neutron Reflectivity}
\section{Neutron Reflectivity Simulator Tutorial}
\subsection{Overview}
......
......@@ -2,6 +2,7 @@
\begin{document}
\chapter{Simulating Neutron Reflectivity}
\input{content}
\end{document}
\chapter{Working with Resource Components}
Resource Components are ICE Components which contain a grid of visualization
resources. These resources can display files from a variety of sources,
such as CSV files or VisIt visualizations. Geometry and Mesh editors allow for
......@@ -30,7 +29,7 @@ Explorer}. For the tutorial, this will be VisualizationModel.java in the
org.eclipse.ice.demo. visualization.model package. Its location can be seen in
figure \ref{fig:demostructure}.
\begin{figure}[!H]
\begin{figure}[!h]
\includegraphics[width=\textwidth]{images/DemoPackageStructure}
\centering
\caption{The package structure for org.eclipe.ice.demo bundle}
......
......@@ -10,6 +10,7 @@
\title{Resource Components}
\maketitle
\chapter{Working with Resource Components}
\input{content}
\end{document}
\chapter{EASE Scripting}
\section{Scripting with EASE}
In addition to interacting with tools via the ICE user interface, ICE also
provides a scripting framework based on the Eclipse Advanced Scripting
Environment (EASE).
\section{Installation and Configuration}
Although EASE is pre-installed in the ICE application, there are a few
additional components that need to be installed in order to provide a Python
scripting engine.
\subsection{EASE Jython Installation}
The first step is to install the EASE Jython engine. This can be done via the
official EASE
repository\footnote{\texttt{https://dl.bintray.com/pontesegger/ease-jython}}
using the Eclipse Update Manager, but is more simply achieved using the Install EASE Components menu.
To installed the Jython engine, select \texttt{Help $\rightarrow$ Install
EASE Components} from the ICE menu bar. Check the box next to the EASE Jython
Integration entry as shown in figure \ref{fig:jython} and click Finish. Follow
the prompts to install the component, and restart Eclipse when asked.
\begin{figure}[!hb]
\centering
\includegraphics[width=7cm]{images/ease-marketplace}
\caption{Installing the Jython Engine}
\label{fig:jython}
\end{figure}
\subsection{PyDev Installation (optional)}
It is possible to edit Python scripts in Eclipse using the default text editor,
Although it is possible to edit Python scripts in Eclipse using the default text editor,
however it is much more productive to use the PyDev Eclipse development
environment. In addition to the usual syntax coloring and other advanced editing
features you'd expect in Eclipse, PyDev also provides the ability to run and
debug Python programs from within the Eclipse environment.
environment if you are planning to do a lot of script development. In addition to the
usual syntax coloring and other advanced editing features you'd expect in Eclipse,
PyDev also provides the ability to run and debug Python programs from within the Eclipse environment.
PyDev can be easily installed from using the Eclipse Marketplace client as
follows. From the ICE menu bar, select \texttt{Help $\rightarrow$ Eclipse
......@@ -82,7 +56,7 @@ you could just as easily create a new one. To configure the projects, select the
\ref{fig:prefs1}. You can then use the \texttt{Add Workspace\ldots} button to
select one or more projects from the workspace.
By default, EASE is configured to use the javascript (Rhino) engine.
By default, EASE is configured to use the JavaScript (Rhino) engine.
Since this tutorial assumes that the preferred environment is Python, we recommend changing
this default. To set the script engine default, select the
\texttt{Shell} preference item. Next, select \texttt{Python (Jython)} from
......@@ -96,7 +70,7 @@ then click on \texttt{OK}.
\label{fig:prefs2}
\end{figure}
\section{Creating and Running Scripts}
\subsection{Creating and Running Scripts}
There is nothing special about creating and running EASE scripts. They can be
created in a variety of ways using the development tools available in ICE, and
......@@ -221,7 +195,7 @@ to the script:
{\small
\begin{verbatim}
# popup : enableFor(org.eclipse.core.resources.IResource)
# image : platform:/plugin/org.eclipse.ui.ide/icons/full/elcl16/configs.gif
# image : platform:/plugin/org.eclipse.ui.ide/icons/full/elcl16/configs.png
\end{verbatim}
}
......@@ -232,15 +206,17 @@ to the script:
\label{fig:myscript}
\end{figure}
\section{Interacting with ICE}
\subsection{Interacting with ICE}
In order to interact with Java classes from the Python script, we
In order to interact with Java classes in ICE from the Python script, we
need to include the \texttt{Platform} module. In order to load a module, we use
the \texttt{loadModule()} function in Python. The argument to this function is a
string representation of the module path, which in this case will be
\texttt{/System/Platform}.
Enter the following command as the first line of the script file:
In the \texttt{Modules Explorer} view, open the \texttt{System} folder, then drag
the \texttt{Platform} item onto first line of the script file. This should insert
the following line into your script:
\lstset{basicstyle=\ttfamily\small, breaklines}
......@@ -303,7 +279,7 @@ Before running this script, you need to copy the \texttt{waveVector\_space.csv}
file from the \texttt{default} folder to the \texttt{itemDB} folder. You should
then be able to run the script successfully.
\section{Using the Sample Scripts}
\subsection{Using the Sample Scripts}
\lstset{basicstyle=\ttfamily\scriptsize, breaklines}
\makeatletter
......
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